Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov

Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov
Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov
Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov
Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov
Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov
Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov
Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov
Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov

Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov

Bibelotslondon Ltd is a UK registered company based in London Bridge dealing in ephemera and curiosities from Britain and around the world. Our diverse inventory is carefully chosen and constantly evolving. We work very hard to offer the highest quality works at competitive prices.

Our inventory is listed online, and we strive to keep our website completely up to date, so our customers can easily check availability. We believe in offering clients items that are unique and rare for aficionados of the antique and collector's world. Bibelot is a late nineteenth century word derived from the French word bel beautiful, meaning a small item of beauty, curiosity or interest. The word ephemera is derived from the sixteenth century Greek word ephmera meaning a printed or hand written paper not meant to be retained for a long period of time.

Coronations in Russia involved a highly developed religious ceremony in which the Emperor of Russia (generally referred to as the Tsar) was crowned and invested with regalia, then anointed with chrism and formally blessed by the church to commence his reign. Although rulers of Muscovy had been crowned prior to the reign of Ivan III, their coronation rituals assumed overt Byzantine overtones as the result of the influence of Ivan's wife Sophia Paleologue, and the imperial ambitions of his grandson, Ivan IV. The modern coronation, introducing "European-style" elements, replaced the previous "crowning" ceremony and was first used for Catherine the Great in 1724. Since czarist Russia claimed to be the "Third Rome" and the replacement of Byzantium as the true Christian state, the Russian rite was designed to link its rulers and prerogatives to those of the so-called "Second Rome" (Constantinople). While months or even years could pass between the initial accession of the sovereign and the performance of this ritual, church policy held that the monarch must be anointed and crowned according to the Orthodox rite to have a successful tenure. As the church and state were essentially one in Imperial Russia, this service invested the Tsars with political legitimacy; however, this was not its only intent. It was equally perceived as conferring a genuine spiritual benefit that mystically wedded sovereign to subjects, bestowing divine authority upon the new ruler. As such, it was similar in purpose to other European coronation ceremonies from the medieval era. Even when the imperial capital was located at St. Petersburg (17131728, 17321917), Russian coronations were always held in Moscow at the Cathedral of the Dormition in the Kremlin.

The last coronation service in Russia was held on 26 May 1896 for Nicholas II and his wife Alexandra Feodorovna, who would be the final Tsar and Tsaritsa of Russia. The Russian Imperial regalia survived the subsequent Russian Revolution and the Communist period, and are currently on exhibit in a museum at the Kremlin Armoury.

Starting with the reign of Ivan IV, the ruler of Russia was known as "Tsar" rather than "Grand Prince"; "Tsar" being a Slavonic equivalent to the Latin term "Caesar". This continued until 1721, during the reign of Peter I, when the title was formally changed to Imperator (Emperor). Peter's decision reflected the difficulties other European monarchs had in deciding whether to recognize the Russian ruler as an emperor or a mere king, and reflected his insistence on being seen as the former. However, the term "Tsar" remained the popular title for the Russian ruler despite the formal change of style, thus this article utilizes that term, rather than "Emperor". Alexander III was the Emperor of Russia, King of Poland, and Grand Duke of Finland from 1881 until 1894.

He was highly conservative and reversed some of the liberal reforms of his father, Alexander II. During Alexander's reign Russia fought no major wars, for which he was styled "The Peacemaker". Maria Feodorovna, born Princess Dagmar of Denmark, was a Danish princess and Empress of Russia as spouse of Emperor Alexander III (reigned 18811894). She was the second daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark and Louise of Hesse-Kassel; her siblings included Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom, King Frederick VIII of Denmark and King George I of Greece. Her eldest son became the last Russian monarch, Emperor Nicholas II of Russia, whom she outlived by ten years.

Size of Proclamation: 32.5 x 25 cm approx. Photos form part of the description.

The item "Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov" is in sale since Monday, March 12, 2018. This item is in the category "Collectables\Historical Memorabilia\Royalty Collectables". The seller is "bibelotslondon" and is located in London.

This item can be shipped worldwide.
Antique Imperial Russian Coronation Proclamation for Tsar Alexander III Romanov


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